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Boo-dan or BoHw-dan: Any way you say it, boudin is crazy good

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Don’t miss Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats in Bossier City, Louisiana

Cheese-filled, fried boudin ball, Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats, Bossier City, La.

Photo: Group Tour Media/Mary Lu Laffey Cheese-filled, fried boudin ball, Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats, Bossier City, La.

Not sure how to order boudin? Simply order a “link” and any butcher in the Shreveport-Bossier, Louisiana, area will know what you mean

There are boudin balls, stuffed boudin balls, fried boudin balls and smoked boudin, too. Some meat manufacturers make boudin, but residents say it is better to visit a local butcher shop. P.S. It is pronounced “boo” as in ghost and “dan” as in dandy.


Boudin was selling for $3.59 per pound the day my group walked into Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats in Bossier City. We were on a food tour arranged by Shreveport Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau. Similar to other butcher shops and charcuteries in “Louisiana’s Other Side” or northern Louisiana, Bergeron’s preps its own meats, sells cuts and cooks others, such as fried boudin balls.

A sampler plate of fried boudin was set out on the counter; the spicy aroma floated toward the door and lured visitors to walk over.

Big welcome from Drew Andre, owner, Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats, Bossier City, La.

Photo: Group Tour Media/Mary Lu Laffey Big welcome from Drew Andre, owner, Bergeron’s Boudin & Cajun Meats, Bossier City, La.

Fried boudin looks like cooked meatballs without the sauce. The aroma is definitely Cajun and definitely appetizing. The first bite came with a surprise. Firm to the teeth and then smooth, melted Pepper Jack cheese oozed from the center of perfectly cooked pork, rice and secret spices.

Bergeron’s Boudin is a family-owned business. Selling boudin reportedly started percolating at a tailgate party. The Bergerons were known for bringing boudin trays to parties and tailgates. Other guests took notice. Unlike a lot of other ideas that float around before a football game, “you should start your own [boudin]business” took root and stuck.

Game day get-togethers are still on the Bergeron menu. A chalkboard suggests ribeye wraps, smoked sausage and boudin balls. There are other favorites, such as backyard cookout ideas that include bacon beau burgers, stuffed jalapeños, pork tenderloin with jalapeños and cream cheese.

Bread pudding and boudin balls appear to be a specialty and a go-to for any take-out order.

Even with stores in Shreveport and Bossier City, Bergeron’s doesn’t necessarily have a corner on the boudin market. In this part of the great state of Louisiana, boudin is sold at grocers, gas stations and even church socials. Most people make their own.

A local customer told me about bringing a plate of homemade boudin to a neighbor’s house after church, saying it was a polite thing to do.

Rarely do I wish that I have a car while on a tour. But I did that day. How great it would be to return home with a cooler packed with jalapeño and cream cheese-stuffed chicken thighs wrapped in bacon. Or a pair of stuffed quail. Stuffed potatoes are on the carryout menu, too, but not like those in my hometown; Bergeron’s stuffs them with fresh shrimp.

However, I had hope. Because some sausages are sold cooked, packing a plastic bag of Andouille and hand-rolled, smoked boudin would not pose a problem when packed into my carry-on. Musing, I could make room for a few gifts, like shakers of Bergeron’s Cajun Season-All Spice Mix. However, I decided to leave behind the bags of homemade cracklins — deep-fried hunks of pork skin dusted with Cajun seasoning.

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Mary Lu Laffey, Contributor

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